Private Pilot Certification – Unit 2, part Deux

*This is a current project of mine. I am using GMS to memorize a study guide for the FAA Private Pilot Certification test. After taking the 60-lesson course at the School of Phenomenal Memory, this is an example of what you would be able to do.*

Alright, I got some time today to finish memorizing unit two, so here it goes:

Unit 2 – Airplane Instruments, Engines, and Systems

2.1 – Compass Turn Error
2.2 – Pitot Static System
2.3 – Airspeed Indicator
2.4 – Altimeter
2.5 – Types of Altitude
2.6 – Setting The Altimeter
2.6.1 – Increasing the pressure will increase the indicated altitude, and vice-versa.
2.6.2 – Every 1 inch of pressure change equates to approx. 1000 ft change in reading.

2.7 – Altimeter Error
2.7.1 – When the temperature drops, the indicated altitude will rise, and vice-versa.
2.7.1 – When the pressure drops, the indicated altitude will rise, and vice-versa.

2.8 – Gyroscopic Systems
2.8.1 – Attitude indicator shows the relationship between the airplane and the horizon.
2.8.2 – Turn Coordinator shows the roll and yaw of the airplane.
2.8.3 – Heading indicator shows which heading you are on, but needs to be set to the magnetic compass periodically.

2.9 – Engine Temperature
2.9.1 – Excessive heat can cause power loss, excessive oil consumption, and excessive engine wear.
2.9.2 – Excessive heat in the cylindrical heads and oil can be caused by:
2.9.2a – Excessive power
2.9.2b – Climbing too steeply and slowly in the heat.
2.9.2c – Using fuel with too low an octane.
2.9.2d – Using too lean a mixture.
2.9.2e – Not having enough oil.
2.9.3 – Excessive heat can be reduced by reversing any of the above problems. Dropping power, climbing less, changing the mixture, fuel, oil.

2.10 – Constant Speed Propellers
2.10.1 – The pitch of the propeller is adjustable.
2.10.2a – Throttle controls the power.
2.10.2b – Propeller Control changes the RPM.
2.10.3 – Don’t use high pressure(power) and low RPM.

2.11 – Ignition System
2.11.1 – Dual ignition system provides enhanced performance.
2.11.1a – Also provides enhanced safety.
2.11.2 – Loose or damaged wires can cause problems. For instance:
2.11.2a – Broken ground wire can cause engine shutoff difficulties.
2.11.2b – In this case, change mixture to idle cut-off to stop engine.

2.12 – Carburetor Icing
2.12.1 – More Susceptible in Float-carburetor engines than fuel-injection.
2.12.1a – Float carburetor engines intake air through a narrow venturi tube, creating low pressure at the fuel intake, pulling fuel into the carburetor.
2.12.2 – First sign of carburetor icing is decreased RPM.
2.12.3 – Icing occurs between 20 and 70 degrees F with visible moisture/high humidity.
2.12.4 – Turning on carb heat will decrease RPM further when warmer air enters engine, and as the ice melts the RPM will rise again.

2.13 – Carburetor Heat
2.13.1 – With heat on, the mixture can be leaned.
2.13.2 – Heat will cause decreased engine output and increased operating temperature.

2.14 – Fuel Air Mixture
2.14.1 – At higher altitudes the mixture should be leaned.
2.14.2 – During run-up at high-elevation airports, mixture should also be leaned if engine roughness is present.

2.15 – Abnormal Combustion
2.15.1 – Detonation occurs when the mixture explodes instead of burning evenly.
2.15.2 – This can be caused by too low of an octane, or too high of an engine temperature.
2.15.3 – Lower the nose during climb-out after take off if you think detonation is occuring.
2.15.4 – Pre-ignition is the firing of the mixture before the spark ignition.

2.16 – Airplane Fuel Practices
2.16.1 – Higher octane is better than lower octane.
2.16.2 – Filling fuel tanks at the end of the day is better than in the morning to reduce condensation in the tanks.
2.16.3 – Fuel strainer drains and fuel tank sumps should be drained to drain excess water before starting the engine.
2.16.4 – If the engine fuel pump dies, the electrical auxiliary fuel pump is used.

2.17 – Starting the Engine
2.17.1 – After starting the engine the RPM should be set and gauges checked.
2.17.2 – If starting an engine by hand, an experienced pilot should be behind the controls.

2.18 – Electrical System
2.18.1 – The alternator provides more electricity at low RPM than a generator.
2.18.2 – If the battery and alternator die, the avionic systems will be lost.

So that’s it for unit two. I spent another hour on it today, so that’s about 2 hours for unit two. This isn’t about speed memorization for me, I want to make sure that I really understand things. This slows me down a little when I run into terms like float-carburetors and fuel tank sumps, but yields a better understanding in the end.

It’s just the greatest thing to me to be able to memorize so easily now. I can now recite the first two units of this book forward and backward, or start anywhere in between. I took a look at the questions at the ends of the chapters, and they are almost word for word with the study guide and what I’ve memorized. I can’t wait to take the exam, it’s going to be such a breeze.

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