Memory Tips – Where Are My Keys?

October 3, 2008

If you’re like me, you hate having to look for your keys/cell phone/wallet, especially when you need to leave right now or you’re going to be late. You’ve all heard the advice: ‘If you just put it in the same place every time, you’ll never lose it!’. Well, that’s true, the only problem is remembering to put your things in the right place.

Here is a very simple tip for you. Imagine that you are looking at your front door from the outside. Let’s single out some parts: peep-hole, dead-bolt, handle, strike-plate, and metal threshold at the bottom. Your door might be different, just pick 5 distinct parts. Now, do you have a spot you want to put your wallet when you come home? Let’s say you want to put your wallet in a basket on top of your dresser. Imagine your dresser and connect your wallet to the top of your dresser. Now, connect the dresser to the first part of your door(peephole). Where do you want your keys? Maybe a key rack. Connect a key to your key rack in your mind. Now connect the key rack to the second part of your door. Rinse and repeat.

Now, when you come home, looking at the door is going to stimulate the reminders you have made for yourself. As soon as you get in the door, you can go through your little list that you’ve made, and rest assured that everything will be where it belongs when you’re ready to leave again.

Imagine now, never forgetting anything that is important to you. Imagine never having to look for a pencil and paper again to write something down. Imagine never forgetting a name or phone number. Imagine being able to easily give any speech or presentation from memory. Imagine, if you will, life with a phenomenal memory. Don’t pass up the opportunity to improve your life so profoundly. At the very least, read my reviews of the School of Phenomenal Memory Course and the Giordano Memorization System. Download and read the GMS Manual. If you have any questions, feel free to leave me a comment and I’ll be happy to discuss anything with you. 🙂

Singling Images Into Parts

October 2, 2008

So far you have learned how to create support images, how to connect information visually, and guidelines for visualization. Now, we are going to look at a useful technique for giving yourself more space on your support images.

Let’s take the first item you have in your Cicero System. A chair, for example. If you look at the chair, you see a back, you see armrests, bars holding up the armrests, a seat, legs, cross-bars, feet, etc…. You can pick 5 of these parts, and suddenly your 1 image has turned into five! When you need to remember something,  you can put the first item on the back, second item on the armrest, third item on the seat, etc… This gives you a lot more storage room in your mind very quickly.

In the School of Phenomenal Memory Course, one of the skills learned is the formation of support-image systems. Students of the course learn how to fit 125 blocks of information on one Cicero support image. I hope you are beginning to see that real, efficient memorization isn’t just about knowing a few techniques. If you want to memorize hundreds of phone numbers, names, addresses, new words every day, and entire books, you need to develop a skill for encoding information into visual images, memorizing the actual information, memorizing the sequence of the information in your mind, and fixing the information in your mind for as long as you need it. With a step-by-step, guided course, and personal help, you can make all of these processes second nature. Read my in-depth reviews of the Course and the GMS System for more information.


Memory Improvement Techniques – Cicero Method

October 1, 2008

The Cicero Method is used for creating support images. Support images are necessary to retain the order of memorized information, either temporarily or permanently.

To create support images, imagine your house. Walk through the main door. Wherever you are is going to be the first room. Now, in your imagination, walk around the room clock-wise, and pick out 10 objects. Every object needs to be distinct(you can’t pick two chairs that look the same). Now, go to the next room in your house. Do the same thing. By the time you finish with your house, you could have between 50-100 images or more.

Remember our shopping list? Now we’re going to do something similar, but you’ll see a really useful aspect of Cicero vs. simply using Chain in a bit.

Look at the first object in your first room. Picture a loaf of bread connected to this support image. On the next object, connect a jug of milk. On the next a bottle of mustard. Bag of Chips. Taco shells. Ground beef. A mop. A bag of napkins. A glass. Dishwasher detergent.

Go into the next room and memorize a cd case, sunglasses, paper plates, kleenex, pillow, guitar, some dollar bills, a pencil, a picture frame, and a pair of shoes.

You could go on, and memorize a list as long as your support system. Here are the really useful parts. With the Chain Technique, if one of the connections goes missing, you can’t recall the rest. Each image depends on the previous. With the Cicero Technique, if the second image is missing, you can just look at the next support image and go on.

Now let’s say you had memorized a list of 50 items, and someone asked you the 49th item. You simply go into the fifth room, and look at the second to last object. When you are trained, you can accomplish this in a second or less. Now you can recall your list forward and backward, and jump immediately to any item.

This is the point where I ended up joining the School of Phenomenal Memory. I could tell that the course would be very useful, and I could only imagine what would be possible with real training, rather than just reading about some techniques that are useful for remembering shopping lists. I can’t stress this enough. As phenomenal as it is for you to be able to memorize lists so easily, it’s nothing compared to being able to memorize books, foreign vocabulary, names, numbers, terms, etc… With a Phenomenal(!) Memory, all of this becomes easy. It’s an easy task to memorize 50 foreign words a day. I can’t really explain what it is like, it’s something you have to experience for yourself.


Memory Improvement Techniques – Chain Method

September 30, 2008

The Chain Method is a method for connecting images in your imagination. This is one of the basic skills needed to develop a phenomenal memory. There are a few rules for connecting images that should always be followed when using the Chain Method. As always, keep in mind the four criteria for making good images we talked about last time: Images need to be visualized detailed, large, 3-dimensional, and in color.

1 – Both the first image and the second image need to be the same size. Visualize the images as largely as you can, while still seeing both images at the same time.

2 – The second image needs to be to the right of, on top of, or piercing the first image.

Let’s try an exercise. Visualize a block of cheese. Now, visualize a can of soda. Place the can of soda on top of the block of cheese. Hold the connection in your mind for 6 seconds. Now, let the cheese disappear, and picture a jug of milk on the can of soda. Hold this image for 6 seconds. Let the soda disappear, and picture a stalk of celery piercing through the jug of milk. 6 seconds. Now visualize a carrot on top of the celery. A jar of pickles on the carrot. A bottle of mayonnaise on the jar of pickles. A paper plate on the mayonnaise. A plastic fork on the plate. And lastly, a pair of sunglasses on the fork.

Now, go through in your mind, starting with the cheese. Can you see the next image? If so, examine the soda, and see what was on it. Continue through the list. Don’t try to guess what was next, just look at the images in your mind. If something seems to be missing, go back, and view the two images together again for 6 seconds. When you can go through the entire list in order, I want you to try something else. Look at the sunglasses. What are they on? What is the fork on? The plate? You should now be able to recall the list, in perfect order, forward, and backward. Pretty cool, isn’t it?

You might get mixed results trying this. You might be doing something not quite right. I said earlier that both images need to be the same size, large. There’s probably a good chance that the can of soda wasn’t nearly so large as the jug of milk. You might have visualized them about the same size that they are in real life. What you actually want is for the jug of milk to be very large, like a 50-gallon barrel that you are looking at from 6 feet away. The can of soda should be just as big. We’ll talk about the why later, just trust me for now.

Now this is very important, and this is the difference between the techniques offered in the GMS Manual, and the training course offered by the School of Phenomenal Memory. If you made one little mistake in the chain method, that mistake would compound, and by the time you started trying to memorize college-level textbooks, you would have *severe* difficulties. One theoretical mistake can ruin your chances at really developing a phenomenal memory. Because of this, the Phenomenal Memory Course contains guided, step-by-step instructions and exercises, along with personal help from instructors whenever you need it, to ensure that you don’t handicap yourself.

Everybody will have different results with exercises like this, because your success is based off of your understanding of the techniques, your visualization ability, your ability to control where your attention is directed, your physical health, and a few other factors. Everything needed is addressed in the Phenomenal Memory Course. For now, have fun with what you’ve learned, and keep coming back as we explore the memory and your potential together.